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How to Tie a Tie: A Guide to Popular Knots

Are you frustrated when you try to tie a tie yourself? If so, you’re definitely not alone.

Picture the scenario: it’s a special occasion and you have an important job interview, wedding, or event coming up. You need to look your best and you know that a well-tied neck tie is key.

Tying a tie can be hard to do unless you watch a video or get a tutorial. Even if you have a tie your dad gave you, you might have no idea how to wear it. After you watch a few tutorials, you’ll have it down.

So, if you’ve found yourself in need of doing it every day, you might want to learn how to tie a tie.

Fortunately, it’s actually easier than it seems. There are some common tie knots for men that are always a go-to. Read this article to learn more.

Four-In-Hand Knot

This knot is simple and versatile and can be worn with a variety of looks. To tie an oriental knot, follow these steps:

  • Begin with the tie around your neck and the wide end of the tie hanging down your chest
  • Cross the wide end of the tie over the narrow end
  • Bring the wide end up and over the loop around your neck
  • Down through the hole that has been created
  • Pull the wide end tight and adjust the knot to sit in the center of your neck
  • Finish by tucking in at the narrow end of the tie

Full Windsor Knot

The Full Windsor is a classic way to tie a necktie, and it works best with narrow ties made from thicker fabrics. It is also known as a Double Windsor knot.

To tie a Full Windsor knot, start by placing the tie around your neck, with the seam facing out and the wide end hanging down about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wide end over the narrow end, and then pull it up through the loop around your neck. Next, poke the wide end through the hole between the collar and your tie, and then pull it down to the right.

Now poke the wide end over the top of the narrow end, and then pull it up through the hole between the collar and your tie again. Finally, poke the wide end through the loop on the right, and then pull it tight and adjust the knot.

Half-Windsor Knot

The key to tying a good Half-Windsor is to make sure the necktie is symmetrical and tight against the collar. Here is a step-by-step guide:

  • Start with the tie inside out and drape over your collar with the thick end hanging down about six inches below the narrow end
  • Cross the wide end over the narrow end and make a loop around the back
  • Insert the wide end through the loop and pull tight
  • Make a small dimple in the fabric just below the knot
  • Cross the wide end over the narrow end again and make a second loop around the back
  • Insert the wide end through the loop and pull tight
  • Slide the knot up to the top of the collar and adjust as needed

Balthus Knot

A popular variation of the Windsor Knot, often used for business or formal attire. The Balthus Knot is slightly more difficult to tie than the Windsor Knot, but it results in a more symmetrical and polished look.

To tie a Balthus knot, start with the tie around your neck and the wide end hanging down. Then, cross the wide end over the narrow end and bring it up through the loop.

Next, take the wide end and put it over the top of the narrow end, then tuck it underneath. Finally, pull the wide end through the loop and tighten.

Eldredge Knot

Eldredge knot is a relatively new and trendy way to tie a necktie. The knot is named after its creator, Jeffrey Eldredge. The Eldredge knot is a wide, triangular knot with long, cascading tails.

The knot is created by first making a small loop or “bunny ear” with the tie’s narrow end. The long end is then passed over the top of the loop and underneath the narrow end. The long end is then passed back up through the loop, over the top of the narrow end, and then down through the loop again.

The long end is then pulled tight, adjust the knot to your desired height, and voila!

Pratt Knot

The Pratt knot, also called the Shelby knot, is a type of necktie knot that is easy to tie and is appropriate for most collar types. It is named after its inventor, Percival Pratt, who patented the knot in 1885. The Pratt knot is a symmetrical knot that is easy to tie and produces a clean, professional look.

The key to tying a Pratt knot is to make sure that the wide end of the tie is long enough to wrap around the narrow end two times. To tie a Pratt knot, start by draping the tie around your neck so that the wide end hangs down to your sternum and the narrow end hangs down to your belly button. Cross the wide end over the narrow end, and then thread it underneath.

Bring the wide end up and over the narrow end, and then tuck it underneath. Thread the wide end through the loop that you have created, and then pull it tight. You should now have a Pratt knot that is neatly tied and sits evenly against your collar.

Van Wijk Knot

The knot is named after its creator, Jan van Wijk, and is famous for its sharp, triangular shape. The Van Wijk Knot Necktie is a great way to show that you are professional and put-together.

To tie a Van Wijk knot, start with the narrow end of the tie on the left side and extend it about an inch below the belt. Cross the wide end of the tie over the narrow end, and then tuck it underneath.

Next, pull the wide end up and over the top of the narrow end, and then insert it into the hole between the collar and the tie. Finally, tighten the knot and adjust the tie so that the point is centered.

Christensen Knot

If you’re looking for a tie with a bit more personality than your average solid-colored necktie, the Christensen knot is a great option. It’s perfect for occasions when you want to make more of a statement, such as a job interview, important business meeting, or first date.

The Christensen knot is also a good choice if you’re looking to add a pop of color to your outfit. However, it is a bit more complicated than a standard tie knot but well worth the effort. Here is how to do it:

  • Start with the tie inside out and draped over your collar with the wide end hanging down your back
  • Bring the wide end up and over the narrow end, then tuck it underneath
  • Now bring the wide end back down and around the narrow end again
  • Tuck the wide end underneath once more, then poke it through the loop that has formed
  • Tighten the knot by holding on to the narrow end and pulling gently on the wide end
  • Flatten the knot and adjust as necessary

With a little practice, you’ll be able to tie a Christensen knot like a pro!

Trinity Knot

The Trinity Knot is also a great option for men who love to dress sharp. It is a classic necktie that will never go out of style and adds a touch of sophistication and elegance to any outfit.

It is also sometimes called the Celtic Knot or the Scottish Knot. This is a relatively simple knot to tie and is similar to the Four-in-Hand knot, except for the addition of an extra loop. It is made up of three interlocking arcs that create a three-pointed shape.

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to tie a Trinity Knot necktie:

  • Start by forming a loop with one end of the tie and take the other end then pass it over the loop, under the tie, and then back through the loop
  • Pull it tight to form a second loop and repeat the first step
  • Continue passing the end of the tie over and under the loops until you have formed a knot with three loops

Learn How to Tie a Tie and Choose What Is Best for You

Tie knots are a fashionable way to finish any look. There are many different ways to tie a tie and if you don’t know how to tie a tie, don’t fret!

After reading this guide about the most popular knots with clear instructions, you’ll have no trouble nailing that perfect knot. So get out your necktie and get started!

Interested in improving your style? Check out the fashion and style sections of our blog for more tips and tricks.